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Book review: What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Children'sVaccinations, by Stephanie Cave, M.D., F.A.A.F.P and Deborah Mitchell.

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What Your Doctor May Not Tell You...

Book review: What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Children's Vaccinations, by Stephanie Cave, M.D., F.A.A.F.P and Deborah Mitchell.

 

 

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by Lynn M. Johnson

When it comes to childhood immunizations, parents are often confused and concerned about their safety. In light of the on-going debates surrounding many adverse reactions linked to vaccines, their worries are understandable.

To address the concerns, Stephanie Cave, M.D., F.A.A.F.P, "an expert on pediatric vaccinations," and Deborah Mitchell, a medical writer and journalist specializing in complementary medicine and nutrition topics, have written an exceptional new resource entitled, What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Children's Vaccinations. This book is a real eye-opener for those who hold blind faith in childhood immunizations, and it provides some sound advice for parents who want to play an active role in reducing the risk of vaccine injury to their children.

Nearly 20 years after the first indication that the pertussis portion of the DPT vaccine was causing brain inflamation and damage, a safer vaccine, DTaP, was put on the market.

As an introduction, Cave covers the history of vaccines, how vaccines are developed and what types of adverse reactions can possibly occur from vaccinations. For instance, potential dangers of Mercury and Thermosal-containing vaccines are detailed, and Cave suggests that parents should ask their pediatricians for mercury-free vaccines, as many mercury-containing vaccines are still on the market. This book offers compelling discussion on the possible links between immunizations and autism, ADD, juvenile diabetes, asthma, allergies, gastrointestinal disorders, arthritis and SIDS, which may leave even the most skeptical contemplating the possibilities.

Given that most children are subject to about thirty-three doses of 10 different vaccines by they time they reach age five, the issue of over-vaccinating concerns many parents. Interestingly, Cave talks about titers, "the measurement of the amount or concentration of a substance in a solution," as a means of determining whether or not a booster may be needed.

"Unfortunately," says Cave, "doctor's don't usually check a person's titers before giving a (vaccine) booster. If the practice of checking titers were put into place, we would probably be able to eliminate some of the boosters now being given to our children, and thus reduce the risk of adverse effects." She suggests that parents consider requesting their child's titers be checked before getting a booster.

On the other end of the dosage spectrum, is the practice of multiple-dosing, which commonly occurs when missed vaccinations are combined and given in one sitting. Cave believes this practice may cause serious problems for children. She also expresses concerns shared among many critics of multiple-dosing about the current research and development of more combination vaccines.

No one, including Cave, "is suggesting that we stop all vaccinations and return to the days when the United States was plagued with smallpox, polio, diphtheria and whooping cough." However, she, "along with a growing number of doctors, researchers and medical professionals, believe we cannot turn a blind eye to the rise in chronic childhood medical conditions that parallel the increase in mandated vaccinations," which are ultimately increasing vaccination rates.

To clarify current recommendations, this book holds a concise guide to each of the recommended vaccines, including scheduling and known adverse reactions. Cave also gives the reader a look at some future vaccines, dozens of which will soon emerge, making it even more important that we, "watch how these new vaccines develop and be mindful of the ethical guidelines that need to develop along with them," says Cave.

For easy reference, a long list of related medical associations and organizations is included, along with details of parent's rights, immunization laws and steps that parents can take to reduce vaccine injury to their children.

The bottom line is that parents be informed. Cave suggests, "Learn all you can about the risks and benefits of any vaccine you are considering. Do not be satisfied with information from only one side of the issue." Reading this book is certainly one very postive step toward that end.


What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Children's Vaccinations, by Stephanie Cave, M.D., F. A.A.F.P. and Deborah Mitchell, Warner Books, 2001. ISBN: 0446677078 $13.95/U.S. $19.95/CAN, 512 pages

About Stephanie Cave, M.D., F. A.A.F.P.
About Deborah Mitchell
Read a chapter excerpt

© 2001, Lynn M. Johnson

 

ALL INFORMATION, DATA, AND MATERIAL CONTAINED, PRESENTED, OR PROVIDED HERE IS FOR GENERAL INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT TO BE CONSTRUED AS REFLECTING THE KNOWLEDGE OR OPINIONS OF THE PUBLISHER, AND IS NOT TO BE CONSTRUED OR INTENDED AS PROVIDING MEDICAL OR LEGAL ADVICE.  THE DECISION WHETHER OR NOT TO VACCINATE IS AN IMPORTANT AND COMPLEX ISSUE AND SHOULD BE MADE BY YOU, AND YOU ALONE, IN CONSULTATION WITH YOUR HEALTH CARE PROVIDER.
 

 

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