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Subclinical rubella infection of vaccinated during pregnancy

Subclinical rubella infection of previously vaccinated during pregnancy

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9200039&dopt=Abstract

 
J Infect 1997 May;34(3):273-6 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut

Subclinical rubella reinfection during pregnancy followed by transmission of virus to the fetus.

Aboudy Y, Fogel A, Barnea B, Mendelson E, Yosef L, Frank T, Shalev E.

Central Virology Laboratory, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel.

We report a documented case of rubella reinfection during pregnancy in a previously vaccinated woman with residual antibody titre to rubella of 15 IU/ml. The reinfection occurred following an exposure to rubella virus (contact with 6-year-old daughter with clinical rubella) between the 7th and 10th week of pregnancy which resulted in transmission of the virus to the fetus. Umbilical cord blood drawn by cordocentesis was found to be strongly positive for rubella IgM antibody. After termination of the pregnancy rubella virus was isolated in cell culture from fetal tissues.

PMID: 9200039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2357098&dopt=Abstract

 
: Arch Dis Child 1990 May;65(5):545-6 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut

Congenital rubella after previous maternal immunity.

Das BD, Lakhani P, Kurtz JB, Hunter N, Watson BE, Cartwright KA, Caul EO, Roome AP.

Department of Microbiology, Milton Keynes General Hospital.

Two mothers who had asymptomatic rubella infection in pregnancy gave birth to severely affected infants. In both, the presence of preexisting antibody was well documented, although it could not be established whether it was the result of vaccine or natural infection.

PMID: 2357098 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2878585&dopt=Abstract

 
Acta Virol 1986 Sep;30(5):381-9 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut

Postinfection and postvaccination antirubella immunity.

Kantoch M, Imbs D.

Out of 1670 pregnant women contacts examined for antibodies to rubella virus, recent rubella infection was confirmed in 5.1% of subjects, 2.2% of which were symptomatic and 2.9% asymptomatic; 89.9% of tested women were seropositive. These results closely resembled those, obtained in serological surveys, carried out in Poland several times in the years 1969-82. Rubella antibodies were found in over 90% of women in childbearing age, with HI antibody geometric mean titre (GMT) 58.7-84.3 (depending on the epidemiologic situation). Especially high GMT--of 122--was detected in women of the 30-34 year age group after the rubella epidemic in 1980/81, which showed the highest rubella morbidity of 5-9 year-old children. Reactogenicity and immune response in 10-13 year-old vaccinated girls were investigated. Seroconversion among seronegatives, among subjects with low antibody level (less than 1:20) and among seropositives with antibody titres 40 or higher before vaccination occurred in 99.8%, 60% and 12.8% of cases, respectively. HI antibody GMT after immunization was 132.6-135, similar to GMT induced by naturally acquired infection in the women of 30-34 year age group after the rubella epidemic. The difference of GMT in vaccinated girls with joint symptoms (152) and without postvaccinal reactions (124) was statistically significant. Practical conclusions for rubella diagnostic and vaccination programmes based on the analogies and differences of antirubella immunity in infected pregnant women, in naturally infected children and adults, and in vaccinated subjects are discussed.

PMID: 2878585 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=4089542&dopt=Abstract

 
Scand J Infect Dis 1985;17(4):337-41 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut

Subclinical rubella reinfection in vaccinated women with rubella-specific IgM response during pregnancy and transmission of virus to the fetus.

Forsgren M, Soren L.

This report concerns 2 cases of documented rubella reinfection during pregnancy in previously vaccinated women. The antibody response at reinfection comprised not only anti-rubella IgG but also IgM. In the first case the reinfection occurred between the 13th and 19th week of pregnancy and was followed by transmission of virus to the fetus (anti-rubella IgM in cord blood and persisting antibody activity). The child had no clinical signs of congenital rubella and is normally developed without hearing impairment at 41/2 years of age. In the second case the reinfection resulted from exposure in the 15th week of pregnancy; there were neither serological nor clinical signs of congenital rubella in the child. The reported case of fetal infection in spite of previous rubella vaccination of the mother does not discourage the use of rubella vaccine. Rubella vaccine induces long lasting immunity and protection from viremia in the vast majority of individuals.

PMID: 4089542 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2857319&dopt=Abstract

 
: Lancet 1985 Feb 2;1(8423):244-6 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut

Detection of rubella-specific IgM in subclinical rubella reinfection in pregnancy.

Morgan-Capner P, Hodgson J, Hambling MH, Dulake C, Coleman TJ, Boswell PA, Watkins RP, Booth J, Stern H, Best JM, et al.

Seven cases of asymptomatic rubella reinfection in early pregnancy are described. In each, there was a history of exposure to a rubelliform illness and low levels of rubella-specific IgM subsequently appeared in the serum. Four of the women had been immunised, after having been shown to be susceptible to rubella, one had been immunised at school without previous antibody screening, and two were uncertain about immunisation. One pregnancy was terminated and rubella virus was not isolated from the products of conception. Six pregnancies went to term and the infants showed no evidence of intrauterine infection. In a further case it was impossible to discriminate between reinfection and primary infection, and termination of pregnancy was offered.

PMID: 2857319 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=4089542&dopt=Abstract

 
Scand J Infect Dis 1985;17(4):337-41 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut

Subclinical rubella reinfection in vaccinated women with rubella-specific IgM response during pregnancy and transmission of virus to the fetus.

Forsgren M, Soren L.

This report concerns 2 cases of documented rubella reinfection during pregnancy in previously vaccinated women. The antibody response at reinfection comprised not only anti-rubella IgG but also IgM. In the first case the reinfection occurred between the 13th and 19th week of pregnancy and was followed by transmission of virus to the fetus (anti-rubella IgM in cord blood and persisting antibody activity). The child had no clinical signs of congenital rubella and is normally developed without hearing impairment at 41/2 years of age. In the second case the reinfection resulted from exposure in the 15th week of pregnancy; there were neither serological nor clinical signs of congenital rubella in the child. The reported case of fetal infection in spite of previous rubella vaccination of the mother does not discourage the use of rubella vaccine. Rubella vaccine induces long lasting immunity and protection from viremia in the vast majority of individuals.

PMID: 4089542 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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