You are here

BOUGHT

Yekra Player

Yekra is a revolutionary new distribution network for feature films.

Bought

 

The hidden story about vaccines, autism, drugs and food… Americas health has been BOUGHT. Your health, your family’s health. Now brought to you by Wall Street… “If you thought they hurt us with the banks, wait till you see what they’re doing to health care.” Vaccines. GMOs. Big Pharma. Three big, BIG, okay… HUGE topics in one film. Why? Why not 3 films, why put all this in one movie? Great question, 2 answers. 1st and most importantly: We need to band together. We need a mainstream film, not another radical movie that only interests the “already converted”. Over 5 million people supported Prop 37 in CA. Reportedly, over 2 million worldwide marched against Monsanto in a global protest. There...ane vaccine expansion, and our love affair with pharmaceuticals- it’s the same villain. It’s a risky story to tell, but would be a tragedy to passively consent to with silence. There is something horribly wrong with health care today. Huge money, billions and billions of dollars flowing into the same pockets. Meanwhile, MD’s aren’t being allowed to actually practice the art of medicine and anyone who questions vaccination safety, pharmaceuticals, factory farms, etc. is ridiculed and belittled. Meanwhile, the billions keep flowing, carried on a river of pain and anguish. Huge corporations funded by individual misery, one broken life at a time. Three huge stories, each worthy of multiple films, but each brought together by one staggering fact: it’s the same villain. These three story lines converge on Wall Street, in a tale of corruption, greed and shocking lack of conscience.

 

Measles booster

Vaccination News Home Page

Recommendation for a measles booster

Immunization Schedule - AAP

Immunization Schedule - CDC

Immunization Schedule - Pacific County Health and Human Services Department


http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00053391.htm

MMWR
Recommendations and Reports
May 22, 1998 / 47(RR-8);1-57

 

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella -- Vaccine Use and Strategies for Elimination of Measles, Rubella, and Congenital Rubella Syndrome and Control of Mumps: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)

A change in the recommended age for routine vaccination to 12-15 months for the first dose of MMR, and to 4-6 years for the second dose of MMR;


http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00053300.htm

MMWR
Weekly
January 16, 1998 / 47(01);8-12

Notice to Readers Recommended Childhood Immunization Schedule -- United States, 1998

MMR

The recommended age for the second dose of MMR is now 4-6 years. Additional details, including the rationale for change, will be discussed in the revised ACIP recommendations for MMR (6).

Routine Visit to Health-Care Providers for Adolescents Aged 11-12 Years

The routine visit to health-care providers for adolescents aged 11-12 years remains an important time to ensure receipt of two doses of MMR beginning at or after age 12 months and one dose of varicella vaccine, and that the hepatitis B vaccine series has been initiated or completed. A shaded oval (Figure_1) is used to distinguish this assessment from the need to routinely administer the diphtheria and tetanus toxoids (Td) booster to all children at this age. Additional changes have been made in the wording in the footnote to clarify this difference.


 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11345975&dopt=Abstract

 
Pediatrics 1998 Jan;101(1 Pt 1):129-33 Related Articles, Help Links
Click here to read 
American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Age for routine administration of the second dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine.

American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Infectious Diseases.

The purpose of this statement is to inform physicians of a modification in the recommendation of the appropriate age for routine administration of the second dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. The implementation of the two-dose measles vaccine schedule has improved the control of measles, but some outbreaks continue to occur in school children, although >/= to 95% of children in school have received one dose of vaccine. Because most measles vaccine failures are attributable to failure to respond to the first dose, that all children receive two doses of measles-containing vaccine is essential for the control of measles. Routine administration of the second dose of MMR vaccine at school entry (4 to 6 years of age) will help prevent school-based outbreaks. Physicians should continue to review the records of all children 11 to 12 years of age to be certain that they have received two doses of MMR vaccine after their first birthday. Documenting that all school children have received two doses of measles-containing vaccine by the year 2001 will help ensure the elimination of measles in the United States and contribute to the global effort to control and possible eradicate measles.

Publication Types:
  • Guideline
  • Practice Guideline


PMID: 11345975 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00044572.htm

MMWR
Recommendations and Reports
November 22, 1996 / 45(RR-13);1-16

Immunization of Adolescents Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American Medical Association

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccine

The sustained decline of measles in the United States has been associated with a shift in occurrence from children to infants and young adults. During 1990-1994, 47% of reported cases occurred in persons ages greater than or equal to 10 years, compared with only 10% during 1960-1964 (CDC, unpublished data; 17). During the 1980s, outbreaks of measles occurred among school-age children in schools with measles-vaccination levels of greater than or equal to 98% (18). Primary vaccine failure was considered the principal contributing factor in these outbreaks. As a result, beginning in 1989, a two-dose measles-vaccination schedule for students in primary schools, secondary schools, and colleges and universities was recommended (18-20). This two-dose vaccination schedule provides protection to greater than or equal to 98% of persons vaccinated. Administration of a second dose of MMR at entry to elementary school (i.e., at ages 4-6 years) or junior high or middle school (i.e., at ages 11-12 years) is recommended (21-23). State policies for implementing the two-dose strategy have varied; some states require the second dose for entry into primary school, and others require it for entry into middle school. Because the recommendation for a second dose of MMR was made in 1989, many children born before 1985 (and some children born after 1985, depending on local policy) may not have received the second vaccine dose. The routine visit to providers at ages 11-12 years affords an opportunity to administer a second dose of MMR to adolescents who have not received two doses of MMR at greater than or equal to 12 months of age.

MMR should not be given to adolescents who are known to be pregnant or to adolescents who are considering becoming pregnant within 3 months of vaccination. Asking adolescents if they are pregnant, excluding those who say they are, and explaining the theoretical risk of fetal infection to the other female adolescents are recommended precautions.

Vaccination News Home Page

ALL INFORMATION, DATA, AND MATERIAL CONTAINED, PRESENTED, OR PROVIDED HERE IS FOR GENERAL INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT TO BE CONSTRUED AS REFLECTING THE KNOWLEDGE OR OPINIONS OF THE PUBLISHER, AND IS NOT TO BE CONSTRUED OR INTENDED AS PROVIDING MEDICAL OR LEGAL ADVICE.  THE DECISION WHETHER OR NOT TO VACCINATE IS AN IMPORTANT AND COMPLEX ISSUE AND SHOULD BE MADE BY YOU, AND YOU ALONE, IN CONSULTATION WITH YOUR HEALTH CARE PROVIDER.